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Green Armor Offers Cybersecurity Assistance to Dutch Government After Breach

Hackensack, NJ – 6 September 2011

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Technology Can Correct Vulnerabilities Currently Affecting the Hague.

Green Armor Solutions today extended an offer to the Dutch government to assist with addressing and correcting the vulnerability created by the compromise of DigiNotar (a subsidiary of cybersecurity firm VASCO Data Security International), which had been providing cybersecurity technology to various Dutch government websites.

In a letter to Dutch Prime Minister, Mark Rutte, Green Armor Solutions’ CEO and renowned cybersecurity expert, Joseph Steinberg, offered to provide both cybersecurity technology and consulting services to the Dutch government, and noted that governments, like businesses, should implement site authentication technology so that they can ensure security without relying on outdated and ineffective technologies such as SSL Certificates that have already been repetitively proven unsuccessful at curtailing phishing.

The Dutch government – like many other governments around the world – relied on users to actively check the validity of SSL certificates for site authentication despite the fact that nearly every site that has been successfully phished in the last decade has employed such an approached. Had the Dutch government instead utilized proper site authentication technology such as that offered by Green Armor, it would not be facing the same risk it currently does of users being phished when trying to access government websites, nor dealing with the embarrassment of having to inform users that phony sites can successfully impersonate the Dutch government.

Green Armor’s Identity Cues site authentication technology makes obvious to even untrained users whether they are accessing an intended legitimate website or a phishing clone. A simple visual cue – designed based on psychological research and implemented using a mechanism that cannot be reproduced by criminals due to the encryption keys involved – is displayed to users as they log in, making it simple for people to recognize a site as legitimate even without any conscious effort, and to notice (even passively) when a site is phony and cues are wrong or missing. While other offerings – including the now-compromised certificate mechanism previously employed by the Dutch government – rely on complicated technologies that have repetitively failed to successfully curtail phishing, Green Armor leverages human psychology in its highly-effective, user-friendly, and patent-pending design in order to make security both stronger and simpler. Users are both better protected and happier with their login experience.

Green Armor’s technology has secured the environments of numerous financial, healthcare, political, and gaming environments. “We compared several major authentication systems, and found Green Armor’s technology to be head-and-shoulders above those of the other firms. The Green Armor system simply offers a much better user experience as well as stronger security than the technology offered by competing providers,” commented Neil Steffen, Senior Manager at EPIC Advisors, which manages over $3.5billion in 1,100 retirement plans. “Our test users liked Green Armor’s offering better, as did our security and compliance auditors, which is an unusually good combination.”

Steinberg, who has also written a book on SSL security, commented, “SSL Certificates on their own have proven ineffective at curtailing phishing. It is our belief that the Dutch government, as well as other governments around the world, are presently vulnerable, and should implement Green Armor’s site authentication technology ASAP. Not only will this improve cybersecurity by curtailing phishing and reducing the risk of governments being put at risk by breaches at third parties, but will also prevent embarrassing situations such as the one that happened in the Netherlands.”

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